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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
. for the first time, foreign policy is now part of this discussion that we're having. i've been traveling all over. this tragedy turned into a deboch expel massive cover-up or massive incompetence in libya is having an effect on the voter because of their view of the commander in chief. and it is now the worst cover-up or incompetence that i have ever observed in my life. >> schieffer: let me get to that in a second. let me just ask you what you said there. are you saying the president, should he come off the campaign trial now and devote himself to directing efforts and that sort of thing? >> i'm sure he will. at least for a period of time i'm sure that the president will. we all remember new orleans. >> schieffer: what about-- what about what you just said about libya? are you saying now that this was a deliberate cover-up coming out of the libya, that in fact this was not what the administration said it was, but something else entirely, and that, i guess, if it was a cover-up, are you saying they did it for political reasons? >> i don't know if it's either cover-up or gross-- the worst kin
to focus its foreign policy effort on issue. former ambassador to iraq chris hill said political gridlock is hurting u.s. foreign policy objectives. and asian policy is a good place to rebuild i partisanship to the discussion is just under two hours. >> thank you all for being here this afternoon, and welcome to georgetown university. we've come together today for a special conversation, a conversation between top diplomats, past and present, each of whom has played a significant role in u.s. asia relations over the past two decades. with representatives from the administrations of george h. w. bush through the current administration of barack obama, our guest speakers today offer their expertise and experience as a look back on the use of service and look forward to the future of u.s.-asia relations. wish to offer my gratitude to georgetown's asian studies program, our school of foreign service, and the korea economic institute who have partnered to bring together some of our countries most respected minds on foreign policy and asia. we are deeply grateful to doctor victor cha a professo
this week in the foreign policy debate than all of japan, mexico, or europe? >>> first, my take. the international monetary fund's latest world economic outlook makes for gloomy reading. growth projections have been revised downward almost everywhere, especially in europe and the big emerging markets like china. yet when looking out over the next four years, coincidentally the next presidential term, the imf projects that the united states will be the strongest of the world's rich economies. u.s. growth is forecast to average 3%, much stronger than that was germany or france, at 1.2%, or even canada at 2.3%. increasingly the evidence suggests that the united states has come out of the financial crisis of 2008 in better shape than its peers because of the actions of its government. perhaps the most important cause of america's relative health is the federal reserve. ben bernanke understood the depths of the problem early and responded energetically and creatively. the clearest vindication of his actions has been that the european central bank after charting an opposite course for
for china policy and what we can do for foreign policy in general. it will validator system, give us the resources we need. and if we do that, not only the energy, but were way ahead of technology the demographic savers. with the best university, r&d, entrepreneurial spirit and the political system. but we've got to get through this immediate polarization. best overall going to be thinking about next tuesday on the path of fiscal cliff, but the trifecta and stimulating sharpish growth, getting on top of our debt problem and investing in the future all at the same time. i think we can do it. if we can, there's no reason to talk about american decline. >> i want students, friends, faculty, we are going to put a mic in the center aisle if you can start thinking of questions, just line up at the night. i don't own how many will take. as your thinking a lot to ask your guests one of the questions about the future, which is many ways every administration is tested, not by the things they plan to do, but the things that happen they didn't expect, the surprises. the question for all of you i
" segment. in the final presidential debate, the one on foreign policy, it was interesting it note the countries that got a mention. iran was cited 47 times, of course. israel, 34 times. and china, 32 times. it was also telling, there was only one mention each of europe and africa, and none at all of india. but i was struck by the amount of play one small country got. the one doesn't usually register on washington's foreign policy -- >> mali -- >> mali -- >> with a gdp 1% of mexico. why mali? here's the story briefly. radical islamist groups have taken control of as much as 2/3 of mali's territory, including the historic city of timbuktu. among these groups is al qaeda and the islamic magret, said to have been involved in last month's attack on the consulate in benghazi, libya. together the radical outfits haver to mmted mali. they've destroyed shrines, impose period sahria law and stoned people who come in their wake. now, mali was once considered one of the few stable democracies in africa, and mali's capital would normally have been able to counteract these insurgents. but the g
and republican presidential hopeful mitt romney debated issues of foreign policy and the economy, we turn to world-renowned political dissident, linguist, author, and mit professor noam chomsky. in a recent speech, professor chomsky examined topics largely ignored or glossed over during the campaign -- from china to the arab spring, to global warming and the nuclear threat posed by israel versus iran. he spoke last month at the university of massachusetts in amherst, at any event sponsored by the center for popular economics. his talk was entitled, "who owns the world?" >> when i was thinking about these remarks, i had two topics in mind. i could not decide between them. pretty obvious ones. one topic is, what are the most important issues that we face? the second topic is, what issues are not being treated seriously or at all in the quadrennial frenzy now under way called in election? but i realize that there is no problem. it is not a hard choice. they are the same topic. there are reasons for it, which are very significant in and of themselves. i would like to return to that in a momen
to implement policies as far as foreign policy, health care, jobs. host: we will get a response from barbara comstock, who is one of the chairs of the romney for virginia campaign. guest: i would just quote joe biden -- the middle class has years. they have been buried because this president's economic policies failed. the president said when he came would get unemployment wellhe said that he was going to cut the debt that was $10 trillion in half, down to $5 trillion. now it is $16 children. he failed by a factor of three times what he said he was going to do. his health care bill, a huge government monstrosity, not level, would end up costing us $2,500 more in premiums when he that it would be $2,500 less. the president himself said if he did not get this done, if he did not turn this economy around in three years it would be a one-term proposition. why we are looking to mitt romney -- i was talking before about how romney cut the budget in massachusetts. on a bipartisan basis with 87% legislature and that the same time he cut taxes 19 times. do get -- to get massachusetts democrats to cut
america and the world. so we need to look at the deficit, foreign policy, also opinions on social policy. >> one of the things that i found troubling about the economist's endorsement was they cited this stimuluses as a strength of the president. all the studies that have looked at the impact of this failed stimulus policy in my view is that it did very little to on have any sustaining impact on the u.s. economy. it largely funded more government spending. and that is fundamentally the problem with barack obama looks to government to solve problems and that is the fundamental choice between these two men. and on issues of the economy and growth and issues of bringer a fair and flatter tax code to the united states, which we desperately need, there is really only one persons who views will allow us to ross per prosper as a country. >> let's look at the stimulus point. we think government should be smaller. but at times when the private sector has seized up and there is no demand, it is quite right for government to step in on to that breach. >> so your assertion is if this election was ab
administration to focus its foreign policy efforts on asia. former ambassador to iraq, chris hill said political gridlock is hurting u.s. foreign policy object is an asian policy is a good place to rebuild bipartisanship. the discussion is just under two hours. >> thank you all for being here this afternoon and welcome to gaston on georgetown company country university. we've kind for a special conversation. a conversation between top diplomats past and present, each of whom has played a significant role over the past two decades with representatives from the administration of george h.w. bush to the current administration of barack obama, our guest speakers today offered their expertise and experience as they look back on their years of service and look forward to the future of u.s.-asia relations. we offer my gratitude to georgetown's asian studies program, our school foreign service and the korea economic institute who have partnered to bring together some of our country's most respected minds on foreign policy and asia. we are deeply grateful to dr. dr. victor cha and director of asian studi
and the nbc/"wall street journal" in late august, the president's approval on foreign policy, 54-40 and, last week, 49-46 and the monmouth poll, 9 point advantage for obama in late set up and now a 1-point advantage last week and you don't want to send people into harm's way without knowing what is on the ground but you can move assets to the conflict and have a c-130 gunship orbiting off of begin gaza, waiting for -- benghazi and a qrf, quick rapid force into position and, have them out there and, the president says he ordered support to be given and, yet, support was not given. there are too many unanswered questions and the administration is stonewalling and the american people have a right to know. it ought to be done outside of the bounds of the political campaign and i applaud governor romney for not pressing the issue in the last debate. there was political advantage to him keeping it focused on the economy but also is good for the country the questions be raised by congress and answered by the president and the president -- >> you said could have, woof, should have in a political cont
. finally, foreign policy. in the debate the other night, it seemed to me there was a difference between a president who seemed extremely angry, seemed sarcastic, and a map who seems ready to be president of the united states. maybe mitt romney has achieved a great deal in his life and has been successful at everything here's done and barack obama never really was prepared to be president of the united states. we took a chance. we took a chance on a man whose resumÉ would not have been approved to be head of any corporation in this country, a man who never ran a business, a man who never ran a military unit, a map who never met a payroll, a man who had no practical experience. sometimes somebody can have talents to be a great executive, never had a chance to show it before. well, he got his chance. you know, we have the highest unemployment for a sustained period since we had since the great depression. he had his chance, and now we got a chance to have a man who actually has been successful in life in a way that converts itself into being an effective executive putting practicality ahe
states, let alone with israel, and more open to iran's message of foreign policy independence. what policy elites here ms., is the islamic republic does not need governments to be more pro-iranian. that's not what they need. they just need these governments to be less pro-american, less pro-israel and more independent. but you often hear in washington in particular that the arab awakening means that iran is going to see. it's only arab allies. or as candidate romney says, evidently without looking at a map, iran's only outlet to the sea. this reflects how it is american elite's, not those sitting in tehran here in denial about basic political trends in the middle east, let alone basic geography. by the islamic republic does not believe that serious bashar al-assad will be overthrown by syrians, the key point is that even a post a sovereign government would not be pro-american or pro-israel. and it may even be less seen on keeping the order with israel quiet. and unless a post assad government were taliban like, serious foreign policy will be just fine for the islamic republic. even
to undermine the president's advantage on foreign-policy. but i'm not sure there's much there. i'm not fully versed in everything about benghazi and the attack surrounding it, but it does seem like there's a lot of coverage out there from some of the largest news organizations in america. host: sandy is the october surprise. we'll see how this shakes out. ben in tennessee, independent caller. caller: please don't cut me off. i would like to say the bailouts of gm and chrysler benefited nascar, because they took all the money that the taxpayers gave them and put it back into nascar, because there were still sponsoring it and sponsoring events. also, this president does not carry ou -- does not care about the middle class. we have only had one rates on our social security. my mother got a $30 raise. it's going on four years now. he gets back in, we will not get another one. the only reason he gave this one was because of the election. host: reid wilson? guest: we actually put up an interesting post last week on the hot line by two republicans who took a look at consumer habits, how much they l
.s. foreign policy subjective. for the leaders, using these commitments is not only the right thing to do but make sense at a strategic level. >> security has very closely tied together a very basic level we've recognized the health of the country is clearly linked to their prosperity and their productivity and their economic well-being. that is key to the stability. >> here at csis the one to understand the decade teach about the nexus between health and security. the senior men and women in our government and military have grappled with these issues. admiral william fallon, former head of both u.s. pacific and central command, spearheaded military engagement during a 48 year career. >> the military has great cadel lenni to respond. i would say that the military is much better suited to the emergency -- we have a terrific logistics capability. we have accumulated medical and medical related capability. >> we found of the decade of military and health challenges has spread many solutions particularly in the way we provide medical care to those wounded on the battlefield. >> we learn that
diplomacy in the region, and it's part of secretary clinton's economic state agenda. for foreign policy goals, the bottom line is that we need to create more links between the new democracies and american industry. we don't have enough of them. let me conclude by repeating what i said at the outset. there are daunting challenges throughout the region. we need no more proof the that attack in september that took the life of four of our own, and left scars in north africa, but president obama made clear no american violence makes america retreat from the region. we'll bring justice to harm us and our friends, but we will not be detoured from siding with history. we will support our allies, we'll partner with the new democracies to achieve the aspirations of our people. we will be partners. you know, in the last few weeks, i have been reminded of my first trip to north africa. this was early in 2010. i had only been in this job for a few months, and it was before the advent of the arab spring, and i was there to talk to a number of our north african business leaders and educators about pnb
foreign policy in asia. it is not because of [inaudible] , not because of civilization, but there is a more recent incident where libya [inaudible] it is because of an emerging global war that is being triggered by middle east. now, let me give you a little bit of context. you know, context is sort of like underwear. you don't need a lot of it, but you have to have it first. [laughter] in the past, we thought of the great powers is being the main powers. russia and the u.s. in the past. china, maybe india, and then there was another side, the navy powers or today, the united states. then, there was an american that they called donald fuller. if you put these two ideas together and where the two great powers, the land power in the seapower come together, we call it the [inaudible] the middle east is located in one of the worlds great ones. small states have the ability to shift the power from one large side to the other. simply because it depends on which side they are on or which side they decide to ship two. in the middle east, the old part of that shadowbox wisteria,
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)

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